Talk to a real person!
(07) 3357 4555
 

Junky Comics: Keep Their Doors Open

 

15178068_601685693362343_3931805135342877249_n

 

The Print Bar’s eyes are always open to the amazing things that make our city unique. Brimming with new bars, cafes and DIY boutique stores, Brisbane seems to be continuously growing in terms of creativity. Over the last two years, a little comic book shop in West End, Junky Comics, has housed exhibitions for local artists, put on a plethora of gigs, transported artists from interstate for launches and nearly splintered the wood of their ever growing zine rack. Sadly however, this might be the last year for Junky comics due to the hard realities of bravely opening a niche business. We wholeheartedly hope this isn’t the end for this very important local establishment. Of course it’s not! We caught up with Vlada Edirippulige to discuss the store and upcoming fundraiser to keep its doors open.

 

 

How did junky comics start?

 

Well in a way Junky was a farfetched plan that I thought would never come to fruition. I wanted to be able to collect indie work from all over the world and make it accessible to everyone, not just people that were interested in comics. I also found that as an artist, finding a space to launch or exhibit your work was a bit tricky and scary so I wanted to be able to have a space that ran as a gallery where people could do just that regardless of whether or not they have much experience in the way of putting on a show. Also i wanted to use Junky as a space for people to meet and collaborate. We have such a rich art culture in Brisbane and it’s all thanks to the wonderful people that continuously produce work and I wanted to be able to house that culture in some small way.

 

 

You seem to run a lot of events, how important do you think collaboration and a creative community is in Brisbane?

 

In my opinion it is essential! We live in a great city and there are so many like-minded creative individuals and that’s what makes Brisbane great! The motivation to be a part of the community and create stems from people actually doing it and other people watching it happening and then following suit. Its a really wonderful circle of life and what makes the art and music scene in Brisbane really special.

 

IMG_4502

 

How do you find the current creative climate in Brisbane?

 

I think it’s thriving and will contuse to thrive as long as we have the facilities and the community to uphold it. I notice people coming into the store everyday and seeing the local artwork, zines, shirts and then are inspired to make their own stuff. It’s a really cool thing to see and be a part of.

 

 

Who are your favourite artists and comic book authors?

 

I am huge Charles Burns fan, he writes and illustrates very thick lined, dark, strange, 70’s pulp horror inspired comics that I am super into. I’m also a big fan of graphic novel autobiographies such as the work of Alison Bechdel and Marjane Satrapi two of my favourite feminist writers that kick ass. Brisbane is teeming with incredible artists at the moment, Sam McKenzie, Niqui Toldi, Phoebe Paradise, Yippywhippy.. The list can go on for a while.

 

16730617_637220599808852_272937863164333211_n

 

Obviously you can tell stories through comics, so do you think a tee shirt can tell a story?

 

Of course, its wearable art. It can represent who you are and who you want to be. Tees are also a perfect way to get your work and other people’s work out there.

 

The print bar and Junky both have an ethos of creating a community and platform for local artists, do you think Brisbane needs more places like this?

 

I have so many to list so just to make the list a little smaller I’ll narrow it down to just West End. The cafe/bar Betty’s Espresso where I am having my fundraiser is a perfect example of this. Cat is always putting on events for LGBTI groups, she’s had refugee fundraisers and is always engaging with the creative community by having gigs and launches.

Nook on Browning street stock so many local artists work, Shannon at Jet Black Cat does so much for the Brisbane music scene by stocking local bands’ records and putting on shows.

There are so many places in Brisbane that do wonderful things for the creative community, its fantastic!

 

 

Tell me a bit about the upcoming event at junky this weekend?

 

The event is this Sunday the 19th we are having a fundraiser at Betty’s Espresso in West End to raise funds to try and keep Junky open. We are almost at our two-year mark and the going has been a bit tough. We want to be able to continue putting on local shows, local work, supporting and engaging with the art community so we are doing everything to try and keep the doors open!

We will have raffles going at the event, Young Henrys will have delicious beers and we will have books and march for sale too! It should be super fun!

 

https://junkycomicsbrisbane.com/

 

https://www.facebook.com/junkycomics/

SuperDate: Love at first byte

 

21131

 

As technology evolves, so too does the way we look for love. With the current prevalence of dating apps, it seems we hold an infinite number of potential soul mates in the comfort of our pocket and all we have to do is swipe our finger back and forth like a pendulum until we find a match. And then we do! That initial dopamine rush… those words that flood the screen and your head with endless possibilities… sure it feels great for a fleeting moment, but will you really have anything in common with this person you fictionalised based on a few photos. We recently worked with a brand new dating app SuperDate and caught up with Australian CEO Robert Mrozowski to see if there is such a thing as “love at first byte.”

 

Tell me a bit about your background?

 

I have grown up in Brisbane and now live on the Sunshine Coast and have always been very social and love organising activities and fun things with friends.

I have dated for many many years and finally met my dream lady and wife Michelle. One thing Michelle and I both have in common is the ability and love to put people together which has resulted in numerous long relationships, weddings and even families. So why not enable this on a large world wide scale – Superdate. Everybody deserves their someone special and true friendship and contentment.

 

How did Superdate start?

 

I have been working on Superdate for over two and a half years with a Canadian mate who knows dating Apps inside out. We realised that people needed a new way of connecting with a person of similar interests, get them off the computer and out into real life.

 

Tell me a bit about the philosophy behind Superdate?

 

SuperDate is the next evolution in online dating. The first and only app of its kind. SuperDate is bringing back the date; the tradition of connecting two people through a common activity.Users can view a variety of fun and interesting date ideas and after indicating which ones they are interested in, they can view and message other people who are up for the same thing. We want to bring back romance and real life connection, with women’s safety being at the core of what we do.

 

1

 

Do you think apps like Superdate make it harder to meet people irl and have we lost the art of meeting face to face?

 

We know meeting in real life through a common activity increases ones likelihood of promoting a real relationship. Research shows that only 5% of people end up in a relationship using current online dating sites and a further 34% using online dating sites have never even met face to face. We want to change those statistics.

 

In 2012 a bunch of Psychologists from 5 different universities collaborated on a research project to answer this very question. They examined (a) whether online dating is fundamentally different from conventional offline dating and (b) whether online dating promotes better romantic outcomes than conventional offline dating. The answer to the first question is yes, and the answer to the second question is yes and no. What they found was profiles and complex algorithms did not account for real life connection and success in meeting a potential romantic partner. According to their research the biggest predictor of success in a relationship is having similar interests and meeting face to face. But the findings were clear that the online dating arena certainly provides greater opportunities to meet people you wouldn’t ordinarily have access to.  So we are taking the best of both and flipping things around. We are putting real life experience at the forefront of the connection while using the online platform to create greater opportunities to meet.

 

So in answer to your question. I don’t think people have lost the art of meeting face to face. I just don’t think the online dating space has caught up with how to enable this online to offline ease of connecting. I do think the online dating space has created a void in real life inspiration and romantic connection. We think we can disrupt this space and bring back romance in a fun and authentic way. We believe SuperDate will make it easier to meet people face to face and the sooner they meet the better the outcome or else face possible unpleasant expectancy bias….you build a 3D vision from a 2D platform and the real life meeting doesn’t stack up.

 

2

 

With Superdate’s focus on matching people with common interests, how important do you think having things in common is towards a meaningful relationship?

 

We are less interested in promoting a profile based assessment mindset. We will enable greater opportunities for experiencing real life common interest activities, as we believe this creates a higher likelihood of compatibility than the current online dating models. The experiential aspects of social interaction are essential to evaluating compatibility with potential partners. You need to hear their voice, laugh together and ensure all the senses are firing. We create greater opportunities for that real life connection.

 

 Do you believe long lasting relationships can be formed from dating apps?

 

Most definitely. Our App can also be used by existing couples looking for great dating ideas and assist in re-sparking that something special.

 

So the Australian launch is coming up in Brisbane soon?

 

Our first Australian launch location is Brisbane and will include the Gold and Sunshine Coasts. South East QLD boasts a fantastic climate and an immense variety of fun and exciting activities.

 

Finally, what have you got planned for this Valentine’s Day?

 

I will be taking my lovely on a Superdate!

 

 

On Screen: TPB’s New Offshoot

 

TPB-onscreen-01

 

On Screen is a gallery focused by-product of The Print Bar. Through a series of up and coming exhibitions hosted in various locations around Brisbane, On Screen shines the spotlight on local printmakers and creates a new gallery platform for print mediums. We spoke to Isabel Hood, creator of On Screen and The Print Bar’s very own designer, about the new project.

 

Firstly, what is your background?

 

I graduated from The Queensland College of Art (QCA) in 2014 with a Bachelor of Design majoring in visual communication design. Since then I have worked in various design studios, co-run an artist run initiative (ARI) called In Residence and started my Masters of Interactive Media Art also at QCA. I also manage my time to work on freelance projects and in-house designing for The Print Bar.

 

Tell me about the new project On Screen?

 

On Screen is an upcoming exhibition series that focuses on local artists who use print-making as a key medium in their practice. The exhibitions will be held at various locations around Brisbane, with further viewing held at galleries and pop ups after the event.

 

So, Is On Screen a new imprint for The Print Bar or is it a whole new thing?

 

I feel it is a gallery focused by-product of the business. We share the same ethos and interests in local artists but On Screen has the opportunity to focus more on curating and exhibiting work. It was important for me to distinguish the two as separate things through the business model and visual identity, but there is definitely a similar idea that runs through the two. By distinguishing On Screen as it’s own endeavour, I feel it has more room to grow. But…I also wanted to use it as a platform for sharing The Print Bar’s interest in local print culture.

 

16359133_10212438650352097_139305258_n

 

What do you wish to achieve from On Screen?

 

For me to say build a community of print makers in Brisbane may seem a little naive, because there are already print based communities in Brisbane that exist. We do want to further the appreciation and connection with this medium while also contributing to the increasing focus on Brisbane’s creative scene. We also wanted to evolve The Print Bar’s resume to include more than its customer based, garment printing model.

 

What do you think of the current Brisbane art scene?

 

Being involved in an ARI opened my eyes to how many either recently graduated or even established artists and curators are so passionate about creating their own or being a part of ARI exhibitions and spaces; sometimes as a response to a lack of support from established institutions or just as an outlet to experiment with ideas outside a gallery context. There’s incredible work being produced (not just with ARIs) and what seems like several events every week, so the passions is there and Brisbane as a whole is constantly evolving. I’m really excited to see how it shifts in the coming years.

 

Are there any artists in particular who have had a drastic impact on your own work? 

 

Because I am approaching this from a design and curation background I’m inspired more by seeing creatives establish their own events, galleries and becoming more DIY. Like an ARI, On Screen has been modelled off an idea of necessity. There are plenty of local, talented print-makers, yet not a lot of spaces or support to exhibit their work. On Screen is facilitating these exhibitions and finding different spaces to exhibit in order to share our passion for print-making and highlight the talents of local makers.

 

On Screen itself has also taken some inspiration from McNally Jackson, which is a bookstore in New York that also has its own exhibition imprint called The Picture Room. I respect how they are leveraging off each other yet they could still exist on their own. It’s a great way for McNally Jackson to establish and diversify its passion for literature, magazines and art through the two projects.

TPB-onscreen-09

How did you formulate the style guide for On Screen? 

 

I used Print Bar’s typeface and the main colour scheme, with added shade variations. I obviously didn’t want to separate it from The Print Bar identity too much. It was really interesting trying to come up with another style guide from the essentials of another brand. I wanted to make sure the branding was also very clean and simple so it didn’t detract from the artists’ works. Assets were also created to represent On Screen as a logo and placeholder graphic to accompany generic information. The assets are of various stylised and outlined sheets of paper, alluding to the elements of print-making.

 

What kind of work are you looking to exhibit? 

 

On Screen is excited to showcase anyone who is using print in an interesting way. We have already started compiling lists of artists who use mediums such as rizograph, screen, woodblock and lithograph printing; approaching their working from a political standpoint or a purely aesthetic focus.

 

So, when and where is the first On Screen exhibition?

 

The first exhibition, Growing Features, will be on the 30th of March at Ben’s Burgers in West End. Keep an eye on the Print Bar’s and On Screen’s Facebook for more details.

 

https://www.facebook.com/onscreentpb/ 

Brouhaha: A Tee Can Say a Thousand Words

 

15338525_1786024381615125_4348061342410735616_n

 

Whether it be by the ink that finds a home across the front of your chest or by the moments experienced while wearing one, tees can tell stories. Yes… they are a staple item of clothing found in most wardrobes around the world, but they have had a place in narratives ever since Marlon Brando screamed love in his tighty whitie. Local label Brouhaha screams love of a different kind…the love of giving back. We caught up with Brouhaha’s James Koerbin to find out more about the label.

 

Firstly, tell me a little about yourself and Brouhaha?

 

BROUHAHA is a small label I’ve recently launched as a way to stay sane amidst a very uncreative desk job. As I get older the creative side of me seems to scream louder and louder for attention, so this was a chance for me to explore that side and learn some new things along the way. I think we’re here to connect, create and try to make the world a better place, so BROUHAHA – through the designs and the charitable aspect – is me trying to do all three at once.

 

What was the inspiration behind Brouhaha and how long has it been operating?

 

A couple of years ago at a local market I bought a baby’s bib as a present for a friend. It had a safari design on it that really captured my attention, and I was torn – should I cut up the bib and turn it into a pocket tee for myself, or should I let a baby burp all over it? I ended up giving it as a present, but the bib served to ignite the creative ideas within me, and pretty soon I couldn’t stop thinking about what could look cool on a t-shirt. Fast-forward from there through a lot of doodling and prototyping to the final months of last year, when I’d arrived on some designs I was happy with and wanted to share.

 

Is there anything in particular your designs aim to represent?

 

Most of the designs are focused around communication or culture; although a couple are just things I thought would look cool. What links them all is that they’re really bright, fresh designs on crisp white and black tees or tanks.There’s usually a little nugget hidden for those who take a deeper look at the tops, like the secret message the nautical flags spell out in the TRUTH tee, or the peace sign the pilot is doing in the MARHSALL tee.

 

14591903_103151416850554_533075234652160000_n(1)

 

Tell me a bit about the charity aspect of the label?

 

Each top is affiliated with a charity, with $10 from the purchase going directly to the cause.  It’s just a small way to make a difference and give back, and there’s some really neat causes we support. There’s some exciting ones I’ve got in mind for some upcoming designs still floating around in my head, but I’m always keen to hear about what great work different charities are up to – so if anyone is involved with a cause they think we could partner with, definitely drop us a line.

 

Do you think a t-shirt can portray a story?

 

Most definitely. Not just the story told through the design of the tee, but the story of your life wearing the tee – where you got it, all the adventuring and laughing and highs and lows and life that you experienced in it. My favourite BROUHAHA top is one that has Come say hi written in large font on the back. When someone sees it and comes over to say hi it leads to new stories and connections, which is always fun. I especially love seeing photos of people wearing the top alongside the person who has come up and said hi to them!

 

15876584_247340965702205_3824822265766215680_n

 

Who inspires your work?

 

I’m super inspired by people who are fuelling their creative fires – whether it be playing music, painting, performing dance or acrobatics. One artist I particularly dig is Sydney-based Mulga, who does some really incredible murals that are just damn cool.

 

What’s next for Brouhaha?

 

At the moment I’m working on some plans for a stall at various markets in Brisbane, Byron Bay and Bondi. There have been a million ideas floating around my head lately, so I’m looking forward to doing some more doodling, bringing the ideas to life and partnering with some great charities to raise funds.

 

http://www.wearbrouhaha.com/

https://www.instagram.com/wearbrouhaha/

 

BNE Girls

235a9835-2

 

Hannah Roche and Dani Marano’s small print publication, BNE Girls, shines a spotlight on the abundance of talented women who call Brisbane home. Although Brisbane often wins the “bronze medal” in Australian creative capitals, the humidity and relentless sunshine that hits the city seems to inspire work that reflects the day-to-day life in the 4000. BNE Girls contains 27 portraits that celebrate female creativity and highlights the many artistic communities that Brisbane has to offer. We caught up with Hannah and Dani to discuss their inspirations and what’s next for BNE Girls.

 

Firstly, can you tell me a bit about your background and what you do? 

H: I am a fashion photographer living and working between Sydney and Melbourne. I’m interested in capturing the relationship between the female body, fashion and design.

D: I am a renaissance woman. A wannabe everything. I lived in Brisbane for 8 years before moving to Melbourne at the start of the year. I occasionally style shoots for local labels and as a day job I manage a women’s clothing store in Fitzroy.

What inspired you to create BNE Girls? 

H: Brisbane is full to the brim of talented creative women working in so many different fields. We really wanted to create a series that focused on and celebrated those women. Dani shared this passion, so we wanted to produce this together. Dani’s a really talented stylist and her ideas translate really beautifully.

D: The amazing women of Brisbane and working with Hannah.  Hannah has an amazing eye for detail and really knows how to make people comfortable in front of the camera. I have loved watching Hannah’s work progress over the past few years and am so thankful to work with her.

Where do you see small/boutique/start up labels sitting in the fashion world when there are so many large established labels to compete with? 

D: Small boutique labels may have large established labels to compete with but there is still a market for the conscious consumer. Ideally the conscious consumer considers their purchases and prefers to shop for locally produced labels. Being able to control all aspects of production can be used to a start-ups advantage and give them a point of difference against their chain store competition. In saying this it can be difficult for a small label to maintain their brand ethos and identity as they expand. We need to be more aware of what we are consuming and smaller labels have the ability to educate us and promote positive practices.

naomi blacklock

Has the internet and broader scope of communication made it easier to start a label? 

H: Absolutely. It is so much easier to promote your work through the social platforms that exist. I have come across so many new labels to follow on Instagram. Instagram particularly is a great tool and allows for labels (and artists) to get beautiful imagery out there. Because of the Internet and social media you can also start a business from your bedroom, which reduces overheads and ultimately helps to get your business off the ground. In saying that, it’s also a heavily saturated place and people have increasingly shorter attention spans, so you have to be doing something different to stand out.

D: The Internet has made it easier for labels to engage the consumer through clever use of social media platforms. The customer is constantly provided with visual stimulus through Instagram, blogs and websites to create a cohesive brand identity. A designer can run a whole label from their studio or on the run with the help of the Internet.

Do you think Brisbane has a lot of opportunities for creatives? 

H: I think there is a lot of creativity coming out of Brisbane – great bands, artists, designers. In my experience it has been a great place to study, learn and collaborate with other artists, but it’s hard to get paid work here.  Often people end up moving to Sydney or Melbourne for paid work opportunities.

D: I think Brisbane has a lot of opportunities for creatives to collaborate and develop skills but not consistent paid work. There are always exceptions though, local businesses like Frank and Mimi, Bianca Mavrick, Lovestar and Talty Sargent found their point of difference and are going strong!

What local/Australian artists inspire your work? 

H: Saskia Wilson, Miso, Brooke Holm, Phebe Schmidt, Levon Baird, Frances Cannon, Intent Journal is an ethical fashion publication that is constantly inspiring me in terms of mindfulness in the fashion industry.

D: Margaret Preston, Julian Meagher, Miranda Skoczek and Elizabeth Barnett. I am a sucker for a good still life.

rachelburke

Do you think it is harder for females to become established in creative fields? 

H: I think in some industries it’s harder for women to be taken seriously. I’ve heard some stories! I’m lucky to know and be surrounded be so many women killing it in their creative fields. For me, the support from other women is something that encourages me to work hard every day.

D: Obviously there are some challenges in areas like architecture and music, but many women I know work in creative fields. They work in art galleries, own cafes, take photographs, make jewelry, create art and they work hard. They are establishing themselves in their chosen fields and gender has nothing to do with it!

What are you trying to achieve with this project? 

 D: To put it simply we wanted to acknowledge creative women and their contribution to to Brisbane’s creative communities. Brisbane is an underrated city brimming with amazing talent and we wanted to start a dialogue about that. We were also drawn to idea of creating a book rather than an online publication because the more virtual our lives becomes the more we crave the physical. I love being able to interact with an object, feel the texture of a books front cover and flick through the pages. You don’t experience the same interaction with a digital publication and a book stays with you for a lifetime.

What’s next for BNE Girls?

H: We’d love to take it to another Australian capital city so we have to figure out the logistics of that.. Stay tuned!

swas-a4

http://bnegirls.bigcartel.com/

Hannah – @hanro
Dani – @dee_dee_sparklehorse

EVERYDAY SUPERHERO: A Chat with Anna Yum

 

21

Local artist and children’s author, Anna Yum, highlights the everyday moments and heroic abilities in each and every one of us in her new book, “Everyday Superhero.” Written as a kind of therapy, the book is a lesson for children to accept themselves for who they are and celebrate their own unique qualities. We caught up with Anna before her book launch and exhibition at The Print Bar.

 

Can you give us a brief summary of what Everyday Superhero is about?

 

Everyday Superhero follows two characters, Rosie and Meeko, as they discover what it means to be an Everyday Superhero. The narrative focuses on the things we do everyday that makes a difference in your life and the lives of those around you.

 

 

What are the main themes and messages the book covers?

 

The book teaches kids that they are more than good enough just as they are. The way they care for their friends, the way they are brave when trying new things and the way they make mistakes… kids need to hear these messages to help them build their self esteem and realize they don’t need to change for people to like them.

 

 

Do you think we don’t celebrate the everyday moments enough?

 

Yes! And it is so hard to just stop, physically and cognitively, and realize how wonderful we have it. There are so many distractions, demands and stresses in our everyday lives, most of them telling us that who we are needs to change to fit with what is required.

 

 

What is your typical creative process and in the case of Everyday Superhero, did the visuals or story come to you first?

 

I have two little inspirations in my house, my daughters Genevieve and Imogen. So the characters in Everyday Superhero are a combination of their personality traits as well as the things they like to imagine they are. And this is a very typical way that my creative process takes shape. People and things around me inspire me; I look for colour, pattern, textures, personalities, feelings…all trigger ideas that make their way into my journals and can surface in artworks.

 

DSC_0278

 

What artists inspire your work?

 

I studied bachelor of arts/education, so my background has always been in the visual arts. Rachel Whiteread was my first inspiration and she would cast the negative space around chairs, so you are left with a presence of a chair. This has always played a roll in my art concept developing- what impression are we leaving based on what we do and who we are. We have the ability to have a strong impact on those around us. Good and bad. Other artists I get inspiration from Beci Orpin, Lisa Congdon and Lauren Childs. All these artist use of colours, texture, pattern and material always inspires me.

 

 

What type of children’s book do you wish you read as a child?

 

I watch my daughters read all those fairy/princess stories and I never remember reading those stories as a child. I don’t know if it is because I was a tomboy and grew up with two brothers where the matchbox cars definitely out numbered the barbie dolls, but I don’t ever remember imagining those stories to be true. Don’t get me wrong, my imagination got a work out with great books like James and Giant Peach and The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

 

 

How do you find juggling being a mother and an artist?

 

I know that most people like to brag about how wonderful their kids are, but I swear my two are the cream of the crop! And they love being involved with any projects I am working on. They are well used to hearing me say “I have an idea for a workshop, do you gals want to have a go?”. And there is never a “No thanks mum” to that one! But in all seriousness, I would never have thought I could be running my own business, write and illustrate a children’s book and keep things all running at home with a young family. I think my kids and my hubby have helped to give me a balanced outlook on life, they have boosted my confidence and believed in me. Go team YUM!

 

 

What’s next for Anna Yum?

 

Well HQ is currently being renovated, so a lot of time and energy has been spent project managing this space. But once that is complete, art classes from 1 year olds to adults will be up and running.  I am launching my book at Avid reader in the September holidays with loads of workshops for kids and a special one for adults too. And I am working on my next children’s book, following on from Everyday Superhero. I can feel a lot of creative juice flowing at the moment!

 

25

 

https://studioannayum.wordpress.com/

 

An Interview with Buzz Studios

 

first

 

The Print Bar blackboard has showcased many amazing artists over the years. Not only the heart of Print Bar HQ, the blackboard is also a platform for the abundance of talent that walks through our door. One artist whose mural we can’t bring ourselves to dust off is local designer, illustrator and mural artist Adam Busby, aka Buzz Studios. We recently caught up with him to discuss his process and the themes portrayed in his work.

 

Firstly, tell us a bit about yourself.

My name is Adam Busby, born and bred American, now based in Brisbane where I have lived with my wife for the past 6 years. My background and study began in fine art, traditional oil/acrylic painting and drawing, which I really enjoy and still practice. At the time an influential and forward thinking teacher introduced me to graphic design which I had no idea about, from which I applied to the program and studied for the next 2 years. Those initial years away from the computer getting hands on with learning about paint, space and form was critical in developing the style and process that I use today.

 

How has your practice changed over time?

My practice has become much more regimented and clinical over the years. Most creatives try to be loose, flexible and avoid routine as a way to stay creative, but I find the exact opposite to be true. The stricter and more consistent schedule I have, the more creative I become and the more work I produce. I have learned and continue to learn that there are a certain number of terrible works you have to get through to get to something great, so it is really a numbers game, the more your produce, the better you get, and the work reflects.

 

Do you approach a canvas differently to a wall?

Definitely. A canvas is very much in isolation and is transient, you never really know the end resting place and surrounding. Walls on the other hand are very difficult to move, which means the art, the shape and the colours all have to interact with the surroundings, lighting and people in a more permanent capacity. I personally love this creative constraint and have used odd shaped or textured walls to help guide the direction of the artwork that goes on it.

 

maybe2

 

What themes do you pursue in your work?

I try to explore all different themes, but some recurring ones at the moment are: plants, lines, textures, faces, and food. Also my colour palette usually creates more of a theme than the subject matter I am designing.

 

Describe a real-life situation that has inspired your art?

Ooh that’s a deep one. You could go one of two ways, sometimes the emotions and surrounding mood such as frustration or energy could influence my art, and on the opposite spectrum a texture of a leaf, the movement of a bird, or the architecture of a building might inspire a layout, design or illustration.

 

What do you like/dislike about your work?

I personally love the process. I nerd out hardcore over things like grids, prepping work and thinking about how things will translate. I wouldn’t say I dislike it… but getting people to value your work has been a challenge in the past in my career. Once you jump the hurdle of lining up the clients perceived value and your time, ideas and labor as an artist, you are smooth sailing and it is much easier to move projects along without convincing people of the value of what you do.

 

maybe1

 

What is your dream project?

I’ve got my sights set on a few 5+ storey building to push the limits of how large I can go with my mural work. Also on the bucket list is to design/illustrate a beer and or wine label.

 

Which local artists have impressed you?

I am a huge fan of the work Frank and Mimi are doing in the sign writing and conservation awareness space. Georgia Hill has a hugely impacting textural style that is fantastic.

 

So what’s next for Buzz Studios?

Bigger murals, nationwide and overseas. My focus is also about being very intentional about who I work with, what my work communicates and who it impacts. I just want to create more passionate work with passionate people!

 

use

 

Check out more by Buzz Studios:

www.buzz-studios.com

Instagram @buzzstudios

Twitter @adamsbusby

Facebook /buzzstudios

 

Apomogy Showcase

 

Rachel Lynch
Rachel Lynch

 

An earnest, heartfelt apology can often create some sharp edges. I’m sure most of us want to say sorry about something (after all, we are only human) and just need a little help to soften the blow. Apomogy is the ongoing community art project about saying you’re sorry with a pom pom. Since September 2015, Rachel Lynch has been receiving candid confessions from strangers following the broadcast of her own “apomogy” on Instagram. After showcasing these colourful-ornaments-of-anonymous-wrongdoings at her recent exhibition with The Print Bar, we caught up with Rachel to discuss what saying sorry really means and what’s next for Apomogy.

Firstly, tell me a bit about yourself.

I am 27, I have 2 sausage dog daughters, and l never expected to start a project about apologising.

What gave you the idea for the Apomogy project?

I made a few tough apologies at the beginning of last year and it got me thinking about what it means to apologise/not apologise.  These thoughts were just stewing inside me until one day, sitting at my desk, I made my first apomogy.  I shared it on social media and the response to the idea was amazing…that kind of inspired me to flesh out the concept

Apomogy_By Savannah van der Niet-14

 

Do you think the word “sorry” is used too often?

 I think it is too often used insincerely or as an alternative to other words.

 How has the project affected you? Have any of the apologies you’ve received impacted your thinking about the project?

 The project has had a pretty massive impact on my life.  There are some apomogies that have shocked me, made me cry…or just lingered with me for days after reading.  The most personally affecting though, was an apomogy that was explicitly directed to me.  A friend who I hadn’t spoken to in 7 years reached out to me via this project with her apomogy “I’m sorry we’re not friends anymore”, and we have remained in contact since.

12990839_1174632109227711_4886640323866523334_n

 

What’s the heaviest Apomogy you have seen so far?

 I’m sorry I’m disabled, I know that’s not what you signed up for when you gave birth to me”. No explanation needed, am I right!

 

What’s next for you and Apomogy?

I am excited to keep collecting the anonymous apomogies, and will continue recording stories for the podcast.  I will be doing a TED talk on the project later in the year (which I’m pretty jazzed about)…but otherwise, I’m just excited to keep it going and seeing what other stories it unearths.

http://www.apomogy.com/

 

Orange Sky Laundry

 

During our existence, The Print Bar has been lucky enough to work with an abundance of amazing artists and organisations. We have learnt that there’s a story behind every print we create, whether it be a joke between friends or the narrative of a new business venture. We recently partnered with Orange Sky Laundry and delved into the story of young Australians of the year, Lucas Patchett and Nicholas Marchesi.

VuLfgus

These childhood mates started a world first in 2014 by creating a free mobile laundry for the homeless and a platform of conversation and confidence for those whose voices are often ignored. Orange Sky is still growing, and their vision of “a world where the homeless are positively connected with the community” seems more feasible as the vans continue to circle the streets. We spoke to Lucas about the future of Orange Sky.

Firstly, how does it feel to be the first ever joint-winners of the Young Australian of the Year award?

It’s definitely not something that we predicted. We were blown away to even be a part of the 31 finalists in Canberra earlier this year and to then be awarded was incredible. From day 1 we have been blown away by the number of people supporting us, believing in us and helping us and that number continues to grow every day.

12143078_1695575553991892_7034849723164590943_n

How did the idea for Orange Sky first come about?

Well, it really stemmed from Nic and I volunteering in a school van. Working in the van really opened our eyes to the massive problem of homelessness. Over 105,000 people are homeless in Australia every night; it’s one of the harsh realities of humanity and a sad truth that many of us try to ignore. When we finished school we had more time on our hands and wanted to harness some energy from us and all our mates to give back to the community. We initially thought about running a food van but then stumbled upon the idea of something new…something that hadn’t been done before. The ability to wear clean clothes everyday is a luxury we often take for granted and we thought that everyone deserves the right to clean clothes. We wanted to improve not only the hygiene standards, but also the confidence of the homeless, so we came up with this crazy idea of building a free mobile laundry.

12074842_1691004001115714_1575729943060907761_n

Were there many setbacks in the initial stages of implementing the idea behind Orange Sky?

Definitely! Mainly people not believing in us and our idea. We approached various possible sponsors and after being turned down so many times, we decided to just go ahead and do it. Eventually a company believed in us and gave us some washing machines. It all went from there really…starting in the back of our old, fitted out van. I remember lots of trips to Bunnings and lots of power tool tutorials.

I understand the name Orange Sky comes from an Alexi Murdoch song. What was it about this song that resonated with you?

Well it’s definitely a cool song. The entire message of the song is about helping your brothers and sisters. These values are imperative to us and central to the whole project. It aligns with the simple idea of treating people how you wish to be treated, and that is something important to us both.

Many people forget that the homeless had a life before the streets and are just like you and me. Can you tell me a bit about the stories you have heard?

You hear a lot of different stories while running the vans. There are so many stories and people that have resonated with me, but one that will always stay is the first guy we washed clothes for, Jordon. He was hesitant at first and we had to show that we weren’t selling or preaching anything. I remember hitting go on the machine a realizing there was a lot of time to fill while waiting for the load to finish. So we just started chatting and I discovered that Jordon went to school up the road from myself and used to study engineering, exactly like me. He made a few poor decisions in his life and ended up on the street. It was really eye opening, it made me realise that we are all made of the same stuff and our life could change at any minute. We all have a story to tell.

10421450_1684029831813131_3596553119894359786_n

What’s next for Orange Sky?

We plan to roll out our services all over major Australian cities by the end of July. After that, we plan to look into rural communities and possibly global from there. No one else is doing this in the world that we know of so we are in an exciting but very daunting position. We want to continue to help countless people everyday.

How can the general public lend a hand?

There are 3 main ways people can help out. Firstly, being aware about the extent of the problem. 1 in 200 people don’t have a place to call home every single night. It is a huge issue that needs addressing and simply spreading the message of Orange Sky or striking up a conversation about homelessness is a massive help. Secondly, we are always in need of more volunteers. We currently have 450 volunteers throughout Australia, however we are constantly growing and in need or more help. Finally, people can help out financially. It costs $6 to wash and dry a load of clothes and donations directly help the operation of our services. It would be like buying a batch of clean clothes for someone in need.

DONATE NOW!

11781617_1669188756630572_3034547169517019252_n

Has working with the homeless made you appreciate what you have a little more?

Absolutely! The best thing about Orange Sky is the people you meet and the stories you hear. It is the most humbling and eye-opening thing I have ever done. It is an absolute privilege to help out our friends on the street. Sometimes the simplest ideas can have the biggest impact.

www.orangeskylaundry.com.au

www.facebook.com/OSLaundryAU

instagram @oslaundryau

She Skills. Celebrating International Womens Day – March 8

There is a lot to celebrate on International Women’s Day. Each year we reflect and celebrate the social, economic and cultural achievements of women, we step closer towards a planet deemed 50-50. One company currently making movements and breaking gender stereotypes is She Skills. Their mission is simple; to empower women with the skills and confidence to imagine, design and create anything they want. So, in conjunction with IWD, we thought we should share the story and ethos behind She Skills.

She Skills started with Meg Solly and her vision of shattering an old stereotype. You know…the classic picture of a stoic male hammering and grinding away in a dusty shed. Well, She Skills aims to reset the universal typecast that power tools are for men and men only. Meg grew up on a farm in country Queensland where riding horses, fixing fences and driving tractors were just a part of everyday life. Meg moved from the farm to the predominately male world of the mining industry. Feeling somewhat out of place, she searched for an inclusive organisation that taught technical skills to women and finding no such place existed…she decided to create her own.

 

With weekly workshops in basic timber construction and power tools skills already underway, She Skills will be expanding it’s offering to include mosaic tiling and building with pallets starting in early April.

She Skills offers women the opportunity to create using raw materials and their own hands, the only boundary being the limits to their imagination. Meg stated “highly successful women in top level jobs have confessed to me that they feel disempowered when forced to call their dad or brother or neighbour to fix things around the house.” She Skills not only teaches women the foundations of timber construction and proper use of power tools, but also how to build more confidence in tackling jobs that are stereotypically considered masculine.


She Skills hosts weekly weekend workshops at

54 Standish Street, Salisbury, Qld.

For more information visit http://www.sheskills.com.au or https://www.facebook.com/sheskillsoz/

instagram: @she_skills

For more info on International Women’s Day:

International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day (IWD) is March 8 and the 2016 campaign theme is Pledge For Parity. Celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievement of women

 

Trans

Original text